Table of Contents

 

 

 

GRAPHIC

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549-1004

 

FORM 10-Q

 

Quarterly Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

FOR QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED OCTOBER 24, 2015

 

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER 1-9656

 

LA-Z-BOY INCORPORATED

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

MICHIGAN

 

38-0751137

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

 

 

One La-Z-Boy Drive, Monroe, Michigan

 

48162-5138

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (734) 242-1444

 

None

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report.)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 

Yes x            No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files).

 

Yes x            No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer x

Accelerated filer o

Non-accelerated filer o

Smaller reporting company o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

 

Yes o            No x

 

The number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date:

 

Class

 

Outstanding at November 10, 2015

Common Shares, $1.00 par value

 

50,192,532

 

 

 



Table of Contents

 

LA-Z-BOY INCORPORATED
FORM 10-Q SECOND QUARTER OF FISCAL 2016

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Page
Number(s)

PART I Financial Information (Unaudited)

3

Item 1.

Financial Statements

3

 

Consolidated Statement of Income

3

 

Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income

5

 

Consolidated Balance Sheet

6

 

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

7

 

Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity

8

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

9

 

Note 1. Basis of Presentation

9

 

Note 2. Acquisitions

9

 

Note 3. Restructuring

10

 

Note 4. Discontinued Operations

11

 

Note 5. Inventories

11

 

Note 6. Investments

12

 

Note 7. Pension Plans

13

 

Note 8. Product Warranties

13

 

Note 9. Stock-Based Compensation

14

 

Note 10. Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

16

 

Note 11. Segment Information

18

 

Note 12. Income Taxes

19

 

Note 13. Earnings per Share

20

 

Note 14. Fair Value Measurements

20

 

Note 15. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

21

 

 

 

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

22

 

Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements

22

 

Introduction

23

 

Results of Operations

25

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

31

 

Critical Accounting Policies

33

 

Business Outlook

33

 

 

 

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

34

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

34

 

 

 

PART II Other Information

34

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

34

Item 2.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

35

Item 6.

Exhibits

35

 

 

 

Signature Page

36

 

2



Table of Contents

 

PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION (UNAUDITED)

 

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

LA-Z-BOY INCORPORATED

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands, except per share data)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Sales

 

$

382,891

 

$

365,601

 

Cost of sales

 

237,085

 

235,706

 

Gross profit

 

145,806

 

129,895

 

Selling, general and administrative expense

 

112,412

 

99,703

 

Operating income

 

33,394

 

30,192

 

Interest expense

 

133

 

145

 

Interest income

 

164

 

233

 

Other income, net

 

512

 

152

 

Income from continuing operations before income taxes

 

33,937

 

30,432

 

Income tax expense

 

12,278

 

10,743

 

Income from continuing operations

 

21,659

 

19,689

 

Income from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

 

285

 

Net income

 

21,659

 

19,974

 

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests

 

(707

)

(445

)

Net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

20,952

 

$

19,529

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated:

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

20,952

 

$

19,244

 

Income from discontinued operations

 

 

285

 

Net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

20,952

 

$

19,529

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic weighted average common shares

 

50,493

 

52,279

 

Basic net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated per share:

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

0.41

 

$

0.37

 

Income from discontinued operations

 

 

 

Basic net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated per share

 

$

0.41

 

$

0.37

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted weighted average common shares

 

51,039

 

52,723

 

Diluted net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated per share:

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

0.41

 

$

0.36

 

Income from discontinued operations

 

 

0.01

 

Diluted net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated per share

 

$

0.41

 

$

0.37

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividends declared per share

 

$

0.08

 

$

0.06

 

 

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these statements.

 

3



Table of Contents

 

LA-Z-BOY INCORPORATED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands, except per share data)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Sales

 

$

724,314

 

$

692,581

 

Cost of sales

 

454,276

 

451,180

 

Gross profit

 

270,038

 

241,401

 

Selling, general and administrative expense

 

216,678

 

194,718

 

Operating income

 

53,360

 

46,683

 

Interest expense

 

245

 

277

 

Interest income

 

369

 

435

 

Other income (expense), net

 

2,480

 

(106

)

Income from continuing operations before income taxes

 

55,964

 

46,735

 

Income tax expense

 

20,182

 

16,498

 

Income from continuing operations

 

35,782

 

30,237

 

Income from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

 

2,782

 

Net income

 

35,782

 

33,019

 

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests

 

(1,154

)

(409

)

Net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

34,628

 

$

32,610

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated:

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

34,628

 

$

29,828

 

Income from discontinued operations

 

 

2,782

 

Net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

34,628

 

$

32,610

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic weighted average common shares

 

50,538

 

52,235

 

Basic net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated per share:

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

0.68

 

$

0.57

 

Income from discontinued operations

 

 

0.05

 

Basic net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated per share

 

$

0.68

 

$

0.62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted weighted average common shares

 

51,076

 

52,662

 

Diluted net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated per share:

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

0.67

 

$

0.56

 

Income from discontinued operations

 

 

0.06

 

Diluted net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated per share

 

$

0.67

 

$

0.62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividends declared per share

 

$

0.16

 

$

0.12

 

 

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these statements.

 

4



Table of Contents

 

LA-Z-BOY INCORPORATED

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Net income

 

$

21,659

 

$

19,974

 

Other comprehensive income (loss)

 

 

 

 

 

Currency translation adjustment

 

(433

)

(482

)

Change in fair value of cash flow hedges, net of tax

 

232

 

(305

)

Net unrealized loss on marketable securities, net of tax

 

(36

)

(112

)

Net pension amortization, net of tax

 

488

 

435

 

Total other comprehensive income (loss)

 

251

 

(464

)

Total comprehensive income before allocation to noncontrolling interests

 

21,910

 

19,510

 

Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests

 

(548

)

(310

)

Comprehensive income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

21,362

 

$

19,200

 

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Net income

 

$

35,782

 

$

33,019

 

Other comprehensive income (loss)

 

 

 

 

 

Currency translation adjustment

 

(3,278

)

46

 

Change in fair value of cash flow hedges, net of tax

 

35

 

(200

)

Net unrealized gain (loss) on marketable securities, net of tax

 

(313

)

99

 

Net pension amortization, net of tax

 

976

 

869

 

Total other comprehensive income (loss)

 

(2,580

)

814

 

Total comprehensive income before allocation to noncontrolling interests

 

33,202

 

33,833

 

Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests

 

(364

)

(387

)

Comprehensive income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

32,838

 

$

33,446

 

 

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these statements.

 

5



Table of Contents

 

LA-Z-BOY INCORPORATED

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

4/25/15

 

Current assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and equivalents

 

$

74,566

 

$

98,302

 

Restricted cash

 

8,976

 

9,636

 

Receivables, net of allowance of $3,389 at 10/24/15 and $4,622 at 4/25/15

 

152,857

 

158,548

 

Inventories, net

 

181,625

 

156,789

 

Deferred income taxes — current

 

11,623

 

11,255

 

Other current assets

 

44,265

 

41,921

 

Total current assets

 

473,912

 

476,451

 

Property, plant and equipment, net

 

173,138

 

174,036

 

Goodwill

 

33,423

 

15,164

 

Other intangible assets

 

7,958

 

5,458

 

Deferred income taxes — long-term

 

34,136

 

35,072

 

Other long-term assets, net

 

63,457

 

68,423

 

Total assets

 

$

786,024

 

$

774,604

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Short-term borrowings

 

$

4,000

 

$

 

Current portion of long-term debt

 

344

 

397

 

Accounts payable

 

45,040

 

46,168

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

112,923

 

108,326

 

Total current liabilities

 

162,307

 

154,891

 

Long-term debt

 

622

 

433

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

79,724

 

86,180

 

Contingencies and commitments

 

 

 

Shareholders’ equity

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred shares — 5,000 authorized; none issued

 

 

 

Common shares, $1 par value — 150,000 authorized; 50,289 outstanding at 10/24/15 and 50,747 outstanding at 4/25/15

 

50,289

 

50,747

 

Capital in excess of par value

 

275,301

 

270,032

 

Retained earnings

 

242,392

 

235,506

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

(33,929

)

(32,139

)

Total La-Z-Boy Incorporated shareholders’ equity

 

534,053

 

524,146

 

Noncontrolling interests

 

9,318

 

8,954

 

Total equity

 

543,371

 

533,100

 

Total liabilities and equity

 

$

786,024

 

$

774,604

 

 

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these statements.

 

6



Table of Contents

 

LA-Z-BOY INCORPORATED

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

35,782

 

$

33,019

 

Adjustments to reconcile net income to cash provided by (used for) operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Restructuring

 

352

 

(332

)

Deferred income tax expense (benefit)

 

138

 

(1,799

)

Provision for doubtful accounts

 

(426

)

(1,113

)

Depreciation and amortization

 

12,679

 

10,996

 

Equity-based compensation expense

 

5,123

 

5,047

 

Pension plan contributions

 

(7,000

)

 

Change in receivables

 

4,980

 

(2,135

)

Change in inventories

 

(21,501

)

(11,006

)

Change in other assets

 

(5,656

)

6,253

 

Change in payables

 

(628

)

(785

)

Change in other liabilities

 

(2,120

)

(6,377

)

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

21,723

 

31,768

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from disposal of assets

 

2,491

 

6,534

 

Capital expenditures

 

(13,949

)

(40,580

)

Purchases of investments

 

(11,693

)

(24,224

)

Proceeds from sales of investments

 

19,409

 

17,827

 

Acquisitions, net of cash acquired

 

(19,232

)

 

Change in restricted cash

 

660

 

7,287

 

Net cash used for investing activities

 

(22,314

)

(33,156

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net proceeds from credit facility

 

4,000

 

 

Payments on debt

 

(283

)

(7,358

)

Stock issued for stock and employee benefit plans

 

253

 

161

 

Excess tax benefit on stock option exercises

 

392

 

252

 

Purchases of common stock

 

(18,461

)

(19,654

)

Dividends paid

 

(8,112

)

(6,274

)

Net cash used for financing activities

 

(22,211

)

(32,873

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and equivalents

 

(934

)

(75

)

Change in cash and equivalents

 

(23,736

)

(34,336

)

Cash and equivalents at beginning of period

 

98,302

 

149,661

 

Cash and equivalents at end of period

 

$

74,566

 

$

115,325

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Capital expenditures included in payables

 

$

 

$

5,339

 

 

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these statements.

 

7



Table of Contents

 

LA-Z-BOY INCORPORATED

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

Common
Shares

 

Capital in
Excess of
Par Value

 

Retained
Earnings

 

Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss

 

Non-
Controlling
Interests

 

Total

 

At April 26, 2014

 

$

51,981

 

$

262,901

 

$

238,384

 

$

(31,380

)

$

7,832

 

$

529,718

 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

70,773

 

 

 

1,198

 

71,971

 

Other comprehensive loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(759

)

(76

)

(835

)

Stock issued for stock and employee benefit plans, net of cancellations and withholding tax

 

898

 

26

 

(10,684

)

 

 

 

 

(9,760

)

Purchases of common stock

 

(2,132

)

(1,267

)

(48,454

)

 

 

 

 

(51,853

)

Stock option and restricted stock expense

 

 

 

6,780

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,780

 

Tax benefit from exercise of options

 

 

 

1,592

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,592

 

Dividends paid

 

 

 

 

 

(14,513

)

 

 

 

 

(14,513

)

At April 25, 2015

 

50,747

 

270,032

 

235,506

 

(32,139

)

8,954

 

533,100

 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

34,628

 

 

 

1,154

 

35,782

 

Other comprehensive loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1,790

)

(790

)

(2,580

)

Stock issued for stock and employee benefit plans, net of cancellations and withholding tax

 

222

 

(49

)

(2,046

)

 

 

 

 

(1,873

)

Purchases of common stock

 

(680

)

(197

)

(17,584

)

 

 

 

 

(18,461

)

Stock option and restricted stock expense

 

 

 

5,123

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,123

 

Tax benefit from exercise of options

 

 

 

392

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

392

 

Dividends paid

 

 

 

 

 

(8,112

)

 

 

 

 

(8,112

)

At October 24, 2015

 

$

50,289

 

$

275,301

 

$

242,392

 

$

(33,929

)

$

9,318

 

$

543,371

 

 

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these statements.

 

8



Table of Contents

 

LA-Z-BOY INCORPORATED

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

 

Note 1: Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the consolidated accounts of La-Z-Boy Incorporated and our majority-owned subsidiaries. We derived the April 25, 2015, balance sheet from our audited financial statements. We prepared the interim financial information in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles, which we applied on a basis consistent with those reflected in our fiscal 2015 Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, but the information does not include all of the disclosures required by generally accepted accounting principles. In management’s opinion, the interim financial information includes all adjustments and accruals, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments (except as otherwise disclosed), that are necessary for a fair statement of results for the respective interim periods. The interim results reflected in the accompanying financial statements are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations which will occur for the full fiscal year ending April 30, 2016. Fiscal 2016 is a 53-week year as compared with fiscal 2015, which was 52 weeks, with the additional week occurring in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2016.

 

During the first six months of fiscal 2016, we recorded a benefit related to legal settlements as part of cost of sales. Gross margin improved 0.5 percentage point during both the quarter and six months ended October 24, 2015, due to the legal settlements.

 

Note 2: Acquisitions

 

In the second quarter of fiscal 2016, we acquired the assets of three independent operators of ten La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores in Wisconsin, North and South Carolina, and Ohio for $21.6 million, comprised of $19.2 million of cash and $2.4 million of prepaid expenses and forgiveness of these dealers’ accounts receivable. We began including the ten stores in our Retail segment results upon acquisition.

 

Prior to the acquisitions, we licensed the exclusive right to own and operate La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores (and to use the associated trademarks and trade name) in those markets to the dealers whose assets we acquired, and we reacquired these rights when we purchased the dealers’ other assets. The effective settlement of these arrangements resulted in no settlement gain or loss as the contractual terms were at market. We recorded an indefinite-lived intangible asset of $2.5 million related to these reacquired rights. We also recognized $18.3 million of goodwill, which primarily relates to the expected synergies resulting from the integration of the acquired stores and the anticipated future benefits. We recorded the goodwill and other intangible assets in the Retail segment and will amortize and deduct them for federal income tax purposes over 15 years.

 

9



Table of Contents

 

We based the purchase price allocations on fair values at the dates of acquisition and summarize them in the following table:

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

Current assets

 

$

3,302

 

Goodwill and other intangible assets

 

20,758

 

Net property, plant, and equipment

 

162

 

Total assets acquired

 

24,222

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities

 

(2,600

)

 

 

 

 

Net assets acquired

 

$

21,622

 

 

The impact of these acquisitions on our results of operations was not material, so pro forma financial information therefore is not required.

 

Note 3: Restructuring

 

During fiscal 2014, we committed to a restructuring of our casegoods business to transition to an all-import model for our wood furniture. We ceased casegoods manufacturing operations at our Hudson, North Carolina facility during the second quarter of fiscal 2015. As a result of this restructuring, we transitioned our remaining Kincaid and American Drew bedroom product lines to imported product. We exited the hospitality business as we had manufactured those products in our Hudson facility. We transitioned our warehouse and repair functions from two North Wilkesboro, North Carolina facilities to our Hudson plant. In addition, during fiscal 2015, we sold both of the North Wilkesboro facilities and most of the wood-working equipment from our Hudson plant and completed the consolidation of our casegoods showroom.

 

We have recorded pre-tax restructuring charges of $8.1 million ($5.2 million after tax) since the inception of this restructuring plan, with $4.9 million pre-tax ($3.1 million after tax) related to continuing operations and $3.2 million pre-tax ($2.1 million after tax) related to discontinued operations. These charges relate to severance and benefit-related costs, rent for an idled showroom and various asset write-downs, including fixed assets, inventory and trade names.

 

During the quarter and six months ended October 24, 2015, we recorded pre-tax restructuring expense of $0.2 million ($0.1 million after tax) and $0.4 million ($0.2 million after tax), respectively. During the quarter and six months ended October 25, 2014, we recorded pre-tax restructuring charges of less than $0.1 million before and after tax and restructuring income of $0.3 million ($0.2 million after tax), respectively. The pre-tax restructuring expense we recorded in fiscal 2016 resulted primarily from rent for an idled showroom, depreciation, and severance and benefit-related costs, while the pre-tax restructuring income we recorded in fiscal 2015 related primarily to inventory recoveries net of severance and benefit-related costs. We recorded the restructuring expense (income) from continuing operations in fiscal 2016 and fiscal 2015 as a component of cost of sales and a component of selling, general and administrative expense. We included restructuring expenses related to discontinued operations in income (loss) from discontinued operations in our consolidated statement of income.

 

We had $0.4 million of restructuring liability remaining as of October 24, 2015, primarily related to severance, which we expect to be settled by the end of fiscal 2016.

 

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Note 4: Discontinued Operations

 

During fiscal 2015, we ceased operations and liquidated all the assets, consisting mostly of inventory, of Lea Industries, a division of La-Z-Boy Casegoods, Inc. (formerly La-Z-Boy Greensboro, Inc.). We reported Lea Industries’ operating results as discontinued operations for the period ended October 25, 2014. Historically, we had reported the results of Lea Industries as a component of our Casegoods segment.

 

In the first quarter of fiscal 2015, we recorded $3.8 million of income in discontinued operations related to our previously owned subsidiary, American Furniture Company, Incorporated. We sold this subsidiary in fiscal 2007, and reported it as discontinued operations at that time. The income we recorded related to the Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act of 2000, which provides for distribution of duties, collected by U.S. Customs and Border Protection from antidumping cases, to domestic producers that supported the antidumping petition related to wooden bedroom furniture imported from China. When we sold American Furniture Company, Incorporated, our contract provided that we would receive a portion of any such duties to which that entity was entitled. That entity subsequently filed for bankruptcy. The funds were distributed by U.S. Customs to the bankruptcy trustee and by the trustee to be held in trust for us during the first quarter of fiscal 2015 and were received by us early in the second quarter of fiscal 2015.

 

The results of our discontinued operations for the quarter and six months ended October 25, 2014, were as follows:

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/25/14

 

10/25/14

 

Net sales

 

$

3,301

 

$

6,788

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating income from discontinued operations

 

$

459

 

$

561

 

Income from Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act, net

 

 

3,763

 

Income tax expense

 

(174

)

(1,542

)

Income from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

$

285

 

$

2,782

 

 

We included the activity of these operating units in our consolidated statement of cash flows with our continuing operations for the six months ended October 25, 2014.

 

Note 5: Inventories

 

A summary of inventories is as follows:

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

4/25/15

 

Raw materials

 

$

93,998

 

$

75,024

 

Work in process

 

11,972

 

14,310

 

Finished goods

 

100,613

 

92,295

 

FIFO inventories

 

206,583

 

181,629

 

Excess of FIFO over LIFO

 

(24,958

)

(24,840

)

Inventories, net

 

$

181,625

 

$

156,789

 

 

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Note 6: Investments

 

Our consolidated balance sheet at October 24, 2015, included $10.4 million of available-for-sale investments in other current assets and $35.3 million of available-for-sale investments in other long-term assets. We included available-for-sale investments of $16.8 million and trading securities of $1.1 million in other current assets and included available-for-sale investments of $43.3 million in other long-term assets in our consolidated balance sheet at April 25, 2015. At October 24, 2015, and April 25, 2015, $31.8 million and $45.5 million, respectively, of these investments were to enhance returns on our cash. We designated the remaining investments to fund future obligations of our non-qualified defined benefit retirement plan, our executive deferred compensation plan, and our performance compensation retirement plan.

 

The following is a summary of investments at October 24, 2015, and April 25, 2015:

 

At October 24, 2015

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

Gross
Unrealized Gains

 

Gross
Unrealized Losses

 

Fair Value

 

Equity securities

 

$

1,609

 

$

(97

)

$

8,261

 

Fixed income

 

151

 

(23

)

37,112

 

Other

 

1

 

(21

)

356

 

Total securities

 

$

1,761

 

$

(141

)

$

45,729

 

 

At April 25, 2015

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

Gross
Unrealized Gains

 

Gross
Unrealized Losses

 

Fair Value

 

Equity securities

 

$

2,014

 

$

(78

)

$

9,251

 

Fixed income

 

224

 

(14

)

50,358

 

Mutual funds

 

 

 

1,127

 

Other

 

1

 

(22

)

459

 

Total securities

 

$

2,239

 

$

(114

)

$

61,195

 

 

The following table summarizes sales of available-for-sale securities:

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Proceeds from sales

 

$

6,426

 

$

7,405

 

$

19,409

 

$

17,827

 

Gross realized gains

 

26

 

31

 

703

 

45

 

Gross realized losses

 

(33

)

(22

)

(539

)

(30

)

 

The fair value of fixed income available-for-sale securities by contractual maturity was $10.7 million within one year, $24.4 million within two to five years, $1.9 million within six to ten years and $0.1 million thereafter.

 

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Note 7: Pension Plans

 

Net periodic pension costs were as follows:

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Service cost

 

$

333

 

$

279

 

$

666

 

$

558

 

Interest cost

 

1,211

 

1,267

 

2,422

 

2,534

 

Expected return on plan assets

 

(1,226

)

(1,269

)

(2,452

)

(2,538

)

Net amortization

 

736

 

665

 

1,472

 

1,330

 

Net periodic pension cost

 

$

1,054

 

$

942

 

$

2,108

 

$

1,884

 

 

Note 8: Product Warranties

 

We accrue an estimated liability for product warranties when we recognize revenue on the sale of warranted products. We estimate future warranty claims based on our claims experience and any additional anticipated future costs on previously sold products. We incorporate repair costs into our liability estimates, including materials, labor and overhead amounts necessary to perform repairs and any costs associated with delivering repaired product to our customers. Approximately 95% of our warranty liability relates to our Upholstery segment as we generally warrant our products against defects for one year on fabric and leather, from one to ten years on cushions and padding, and provide a limited lifetime warranty on certain mechanisms and frames. Our warranties cover labor costs relating to our parts for one year. Our warranty period begins when the consumer receives our product. We use considerable judgment in making our estimates, and we record differences between our actual and estimated costs when the differences are known.

 

A reconciliation of the changes in our product warranty liability is as follows:

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Balance as of the beginning of the period

 

$

17,230

 

$

15,256

 

$

16,870

 

$

16,013

 

Accruals during the period

 

5,651

 

4,413

 

10,762

 

8,730

 

Accrual adjustments

 

 

 

 

(953

)

Settlements during the period

 

(4,820

)

(4,129

)

(9,571

)

(8,250

)

Balance as of the end of the period

 

$

18,061

 

$

15,540

 

$

18,061

 

$

15,540

 

 

As of October 24, 2015, and April 25, 2015, we included $10.9 million and $10.2 million, respectively, of our product warranty liability in accrued expenses and other current liabilities in our consolidated balance sheet, and included the remainder in other long-term liabilities. We recorded accruals during the periods presented primarily to reflect charges that relate to warranties issued during the respective periods. Our accrual adjustments reflect a change in the prior estimates of our product warranty liability.

 

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Note 9: Stock-Based Compensation

 

The table below summarizes the total stock-based compensation expense we recognized for all outstanding grants in our consolidated statement of income:

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Equity-based awards expense

 

$

2,111

 

$

2,037

 

$

5,123

 

$

5,047

 

Liability-based awards expense

 

1,507

 

821

 

1,068

 

373

 

Total stock-based compensation expense

 

$

3,618

 

$

2,858

 

$

6,191

 

$

5,420

 

 

Stock Options. We granted 429,754 stock options to employees during the first quarter of fiscal 2016, and we have stock options outstanding from previous grants. We account for stock options as equity-based awards because when they are exercised, they will be settled in common shares. We recognize compensation expense for stock options over the vesting period equal to the fair value on the date our compensation committee approved the awards. The vesting period for our stock options ranges from one to four years, with accelerated vesting upon retirement. We expense options granted to retirement-eligible employees immediately. We estimate the fair value of the employee stock options at the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model, which requires management to make certain assumptions. We estimate expected volatility based on the historical volatility of our common shares. We base the average expected life on the contractual term of the stock option and expected employee exercise trends. We base the risk-free rate on U.S. Treasury issues with a term equal to the expected life assumed at the date of the grant.

 

We calculated the fair value of stock options granted during the first quarter of fiscal 2016 using the following assumptions:

 

(Unaudited)

 

7/25/15

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

1.54

%

Dividend rate

 

1.20

%

Expected life in years

 

5.0

 

Stock price volatility

 

44.37

%

Fair value per share

 

$

9.69

 

 

Stock Appreciation Rights (“SARs”). We did not grant any SARs to employees during the first six months of fiscal 2016, but we have SARs outstanding from previous grants. SARs will be paid in cash upon exercise and, accordingly, we account for SARs as liability-based awards that we re-measure to reflect their fair value at the end of each reporting period. These awards vest at 25% per year, beginning one year from the grant date for a term of four years, with accelerated vesting upon retirement. We expense SARs granted to retirement-eligible employees immediately. We estimate the fair value of SARs at the end of each reporting period using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model, which requires management to make certain assumptions. We base the average expected life on the contractual term of the SARs and expected employee exercise trends (which is consistent with the expected life of our option awards). We base the risk-free rate on U.S. Treasury issues with a term equal to the expected life assumed at the end of the reporting period.

 

In fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013, we granted SARs as described in our Annual Reports on Form 10-K for the fiscal years ended April 26, 2014, and April 27, 2013, respectively. At October 24, 2015, we measured the fair value of the SARs granted during these fiscal years using the following assumptions:

 

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Table of Contents

 

(Unaudited)

 

Fiscal 2014
grant

 

Fiscal 2013
grant

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

1.01

%

0.71

%

Dividend rate

 

1.12

%

1.12

%

Expected life in years

 

2.65

 

1.73

 

Stock price volatility

 

29.01

%

27.71

%

Fair value per share

 

$

10.28

 

$

16.15

 

 

Restricted Stock. We awarded 89,563 shares of restricted stock to employees during the first quarter of fiscal 2016. We issue restricted stock at no cost to the employees, and the shares are held in an escrow account until the vesting period ends. If a recipient’s employment ends during the escrow period (other than through death or disability), the shares are returned at no cost to the company. We account for restricted stock awards as equity-based awards because upon vesting, they will be settled in common shares. The fair value of the restricted stock that was awarded in the first quarter of fiscal 2016 was $26.69 per share, the market value of our common shares on the date of grant. We recognize compensation expense for restricted stock over the vesting period equal to the fair value on the date our compensation committee approved the awards. Restricted stock awards vest at 25% per year, beginning one year from the grant date for a term of four years.

 

Restricted Stock Units. We did not grant any restricted stock units to employees during the first six months of fiscal 2016, but we have restricted stock units outstanding from previous grants. We account for these units as liability-based awards because upon vesting, these awards will be paid in cash. We measure and recognize initial compensation expense based on the market value (intrinsic value) of our common stock on the grant date and amortize the expense over the vesting period. We re-measure and adjust the liability based on the market value (intrinsic value) of our common shares on the last day of the reporting period until paid with a corresponding adjustment to reflect the cumulative amount of compensation expense. The fair value of each outstanding restricted stock unit at October 24, 2015, was $28.50, the market value of our common shares on the last day of the reporting period. Each restricted stock unit is the equivalent of one common share. Restricted stock units vest at 25% per year, beginning one year from the grant date for a term of four years.

 

During the second quarter of fiscal 2016, we granted 21,632 restricted stock units to our non-employee directors. These restricted stock units vest when the director leaves the board. We account for these restricted stock units as equity-based awards as they will be settled in shares of our common stock upon vesting. We measure and recognize compensation expense for these awards based on the market price of our common shares on the date of grant, which was $27.74.

 

Performance Awards. During the first quarter of fiscal 2016, we granted 182,008 performance-based shares, and we have performance-based share awards outstanding from previous grants. Payout of these grants depends on our financial performance (80%) and a market-based condition based on the total return our shareholders receive on their investment in our stock relative to returns earned through investments in other public companies (20%). The performance award opportunity ranges from 50% of the employee’s target award if minimum performance requirements are met to a maximum of 200% of the target award based on the attainment of certain financial and shareholder-return goals over a specific performance period, which is generally three fiscal years.

 

We account for performance-based shares as equity-based awards because upon vesting, they will be settled in common shares. For shares that vest based on our results relative to the performance goals, we expense as compensation cost the fair value of the shares as of the day we granted the awards recognized over the performance period, taking into account the probability that we will satisfy the performance goals. The fair

 

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Table of Contents

 

value of each share of the awards we granted in fiscal 2016 that vest based on attaining performance goals was $25.73, the market value of our common shares on the date we granted the awards less the dividends we expect to pay before the shares vest. For shares that vest based on market conditions, we use a Monte Carlo valuation model to estimate each share’s fair value as of the date of grant, and, similar to the way in which we expense awards of stock options, we expense compensation cost over the vesting period regardless of the value that award recipients ultimately receive. Based on the Monte Carlo model, the fair value as of the grant date of the fiscal 2016 grant of shares that vest based on market conditions was $34.40.

 

We did not grant any performance-based units during the first six months of fiscal 2016, but we have outstanding performance-based unit awards from our fiscal 2014 grant. We account for performance-based units as liability-based awards because upon vesting, they will be paid in cash. For units that vest based on our results relative to performance goals, we expense as compensation cost over the performance period the fair value of each unit, taking into account the probability that the performance goals will be attained. The fair value of each unit we granted in fiscal 2014 that vests based on attaining performance goals was $28.26, the market value of our common shares on the last day of the reporting period less the dividends we expect to pay before the awards vest. For performance-based units that vest based on market conditions, we use a Monte Carlo valuation model to estimate each unit’s fair value as of the last day of the reporting period. We re-measure and adjust the liability for these units based on the Monte Carlo valuation at the end of each reporting period until we pay out the units. Based on the Monte Carlo model, the fair value at October 24, 2015, of the fiscal 2014 grant of units that vest based on market conditions was $50.68.

 

Note 10: Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

 

The activity in accumulated other comprehensive loss for the quarter ended October 24, 2015, and October 25, 2014, is as follows:

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

Translation
adjustment

 

Change in
fair value
of cash
flow hedge

 

Unrealized
gain on
marketable
securities

 

Net pension
amortization
and net
actuarial
loss

 

Accumulated
other
comprehensive
loss

 

Balance at July 25, 2015

 

$

(697

)

$

(757

)

$

1,328

 

$

(34,213

)

$

(34,339

)

Changes before reclassifications

 

(274

)

(269

)

(65

)

 

(608

)

Amounts reclassified to net income

 

 

645

 

6

 

788

 

1,439

 

Tax effect

 

 

(144

)

23

 

(300

)

(421

)

Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

(274

)

232

 

(36

)

488

 

410

 

Balance at October 24, 2015

 

$

(971

)

$

(525

)

$

1,292

 

$

(33,725

)

$

(33,929

)

 

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Table of Contents

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

Translation
adjustment

 

Change in
fair value
of cash
flow hedge

 

Unrealized
gain on
marketable
securities

 

Net pension
amortization
and net
actuarial
loss

 

Accumulated
other
comprehensive
loss

 

Balance at July 26, 2014

 

$

2,870

 

$

52

 

$

1,309

 

$

(34,446

)

$

(30,215

)

Changes before reclassifications

 

(347

)

(532

)

(173

)

 

(1,052

)

Amounts reclassified to net income

 

 

40

 

(9

)

702

 

733

 

Tax effect

 

 

187

 

70

 

(267

)

(10

)

Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

(347

)

(305

)

(112

)

435

 

(329

)

Balance at October 25, 2014

 

$

2,523

 

$

(253

)

$

1,197

 

$

(34,011

)

$

(30,544

)

 

The activity in accumulated other comprehensive loss for the six months ended October 24, 2015, and October 25, 2014, is as follows:

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

Translation
adjustment

 

Change in
fair value
of cash
flow hedge

 

Unrealized
gain on
marketable
securities

 

Net pension
amortization
and net
actuarial
loss

 

Accumulated
other
comprehensive
loss

 

Balance at April 25, 2015

 

$

1,517

 

$

(560

)

$

1,605

 

$

(34,701

)

$

(32,139

)

Changes before reclassifications

 

(2,488

)

(1,055

)

(341

)

 

(3,884

)

Amounts reclassified to net income

 

 

1,112

 

(165

)

1,577

 

2,524

 

Tax effect

 

 

(22

)

193

 

(601

)

(430

)

Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

(2,488

)

35

 

(313

)

976

 

(1,790

)

Balance at October 24, 2015

 

$

(971

)

$

(525

)

$

1,292

 

$

(33,725

)

$

(33,929

)

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

Translation
adjustment

 

Change in
fair value
of cash
flow hedge

 

Unrealized
gain on
marketable
securities

 

Net pension
amortization
and net
actuarial
loss

 

Accumulated
other
comprehensive
loss

 

Balance at April 26, 2014

 

$

2,455

 

$

(53

)

$

1,098

 

$

(34,880

)

$

(31,380

)

Changes before reclassifications

 

68

 

(380

)

174

 

 

(138

)

Amounts reclassified to net income

 

 

58

 

(15

)

1,403

 

1,446

 

Tax effect

 

 

122

 

(60

)

(534

)

(472

)

Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

68

 

(200

)

99

 

869

 

836

 

Balance at October 25, 2014

 

$

2,523

 

$

(253

)

$

1,197

 

$

(34,011

)

$

(30,544

)

 

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Table of Contents

 

We reclassified the unrealized gain on marketable securities from accumulated other comprehensive loss to net income through other income in our consolidated statement of income, reclassified the change in fair value of cash flow hedges to net income through cost of sales, and reclassified the net pension amortization to net income through selling, general and administrative expense.

 

The components of non-controlling interest for the quarter and six months ended October 24, 2015, and October 25, 2014, were as follows:

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Balance as of the beginning of the period

 

$

8,770

 

$

7,909

 

$

8,954

 

$

7,832

 

Net income

 

707

 

445

 

1,154

 

409

 

Other comprehensive loss

 

(159

)

(135

)

(790

)

(22

)

Balance as of the end of the period

 

$

9,318

 

$

8,219

 

$

9,318

 

$

8,219

 

 

Note 11: Segment Information

 

Our reportable operating segments are the Upholstery segment, the Casegoods segment and the Retail segment.

 

Upholstery Segment. The Upholstery segment consists primarily of two operating units: La-Z-Boy and England. This segment manufactures and imports upholstered furniture. Upholstered furniture includes recliners and motion furniture, sofas, loveseats, chairs, sectionals, modulars, ottomans and sleeper sofas. The Upholstery segment sells directly to La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores, operators of La-Z-Boy Comfort Studio® locations and England Custom Comfort Center locations, major dealers, and a wide cross-section of other independent retailers.

 

Casegoods Segment. The Casegoods segment consists of three brands: American Drew, Hammary, and Kincaid. This segment sells imported wood furniture to furniture retailers. Casegoods product includes bedroom, dining room, entertainment centers, occasional pieces and some manufactured coordinated upholstered furniture. The Casegoods segment sells directly to major dealers, as well as La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores, and a wide cross-section of other independent retailers.

 

Retail Segment. The Retail segment consists of 123 company-owned La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores. The Retail segment sells upholstered furniture, and some casegoods and other accessories, to end consumers through the retail network.

 

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Table of Contents

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upholstery segment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales to external customers

 

$

260,080

 

$

255,044

 

$

492,564

 

$

482,200

 

Intersegment sales

 

45,737

 

42,223

 

85,929

 

77,926

 

Upholstery segment sales

 

305,817

 

297,267

 

578,493

 

560,126

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casegoods segment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales to external customers

 

25,787

 

25,455

 

46,989

 

51,408

 

Intersegment sales

 

2,432

 

3,433

 

4,623

 

6,403

 

Casegoods segment sales

 

28,219

 

28,888

 

51,612

 

57,811

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Retail segment sales

 

96,480

 

84,589

 

183,131

 

157,494

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corporate and Other:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales to external customers

 

544

 

513

 

1,630

 

1,479

 

Intersegment sales

 

750

 

 

1,266

 

 

Corporate and Other sales

 

1,294

 

513

 

2,896

 

1,479

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eliminations

 

(48,919

)

(45,656

)

(91,818

)

(84,329

)

Consolidated sales

 

$

382,891

 

$

365,601

 

$

724,314

 

$

692,581

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Income (Loss)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upholstery segment

 

$

37,040

 

$

32,607

 

$

61,634

 

$

54,624

 

Casegoods segment

 

2,634

 

2,995

 

4,324

 

4,520

 

Retail segment

 

5,716

 

3,682

 

10,445

 

3,997

 

Restructuring

 

(187

)

(10

)

(352

)

347

 

Corporate and Other

 

(11,809

)

(9,082

)

(22,691

)

(16,805

)

Consolidated operating income

 

33,394

 

30,192

 

53,360

 

46,683

 

Interest expense

 

133

 

145

 

245

 

277

 

Interest income

 

164

 

233

 

369

 

435

 

Other income (expense), net

 

512

 

152

 

2,480

 

(106

)

Income from continuing operations before income taxes

 

$

33,937

 

$

30,432

 

$

55,964

 

$

46,735

 

 

Note 12: Income Taxes

 

Our effective tax rates for continuing operations for the second quarter and six months ended October 24, 2015, were 36.2% and 36.1%, respectively, compared with 35.3% for both the second quarter and six months ended October 25, 2014. Our effective tax rate varies from the 35% statutory rate primarily due to state taxes, less the benefit of the U.S. manufacturing deduction and foreign earnings in jurisdictions with lower tax rates than the U.S.

 

Our consolidated balance sheet at the end of the second quarter of fiscal 2016 reflected a $0.9 million net liability for uncertain income tax positions. We do not expect this net liability to change significantly in the next

 

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12 months. We will either pay or release the liability for uncertain income tax positions as tax audits are completed or settled, statutes of limitation expire or other new information becomes available.

 

Note 13: Earnings per Share

 

Certain share-based compensation awards that entitle their holders to receive non-forfeitable dividends prior to vesting are considered participating securities. We grant restricted stock awards that contain non-forfeitable rights to dividends on unvested shares, and we are required to include these participating securities in calculating our basic earnings per common share, using the two-class method.

 

The following is a reconciliation of the numerators and denominators we used in our computations of basic and diluted earnings per share:

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Numerator (basic and diluted):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income attributable to La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

$

20,952

 

$

19,529

 

$

34,628

 

$

32,610

 

Income allocated to participating securities

 

(107

)

(103

)

(185

)

(187

)

Net income available to common shareholders

 

$

20,845

 

$

19,426

 

$

34,443

 

$

32,423

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Denominator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic weighted average common shares outstanding

 

50,493

 

52,279

 

50,538

 

52,235

 

Add:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contingent common shares

 

178

 

161

 

178

 

132

 

Stock option dilution

 

368

 

283

 

360

 

295

 

Diluted weighted average common shares outstanding

 

51,039

 

52,723

 

51,076

 

52,662

 

 

The above values for contingent common shares reflect the dilutive effect of common shares that we would have issued to employees under the terms of performance-based share awards if the relevant performance period for the award had been the reporting period.

 

We had outstanding options to purchase 0.4 million shares for the quarter and six months ended October 25, 2014, with a weighted average exercise price of $23.63. We excluded the effect of these options from our diluted share calculation since, for each period presented, the weighted average exercise price of the options was higher than the average market price, and including the options’ effect would have been anti-dilutive. We did not exclude any outstanding options for the quarter and six months ended October 24, 2015.

 

Note 14: Fair Value Measurements

 

Accounting standards require that we put financial assets and liabilities into one of three categories based on the inputs we use to value them:

 

·                  Level 1 — Financial assets and liabilities the values of which are based on unadjusted quoted market prices for identical assets and liabilities in an active market that we have the ability to access.

 

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·                  Level 2 — Financial assets and liabilities the values of which are based on quoted prices in markets that are not active or on model inputs that are observable for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.

 

·                  Level 3 — Financial assets and liabilities the values of which are based on prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both unobservable and significant to the overall fair value measurement.

 

Accounting standards require that in making fair value measurements, we use observable market data when they are available. When inputs used to measure fair value fall within different levels of the hierarchy, the level within which the fair value measurement is categorized, is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement. We recognize transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy at the end of the reporting period in which they occur.

 

In addition to assets and liabilities that we record at fair value on a recurring basis, we are required to record assets and liabilities at fair value on a non-recurring basis. We measure non-financial assets such as trade names, goodwill, and other long-lived assets at fair value when there is an indicator of impairment, and we record them at fair value only when we recognize an impairment loss.

 

The following table presents the fair value hierarchy for those assets we measured at fair value on a recurring basis at October 24, 2015, and April 25, 2015:

 

At October 24, 2015

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

Level 1(a)

 

Level 2(a)

 

Level 3

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Available-for-sale securities

 

$

1,415

 

$

44,314

 

$

 

 

(a)         There were no transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 during fiscal 2016.

 

At April 25, 2015

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

Level 1(b)

 

Level 2(b)

 

Level 3

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Available-for-sale securities

 

$

1,552

 

$

58,516

 

$

 

Trading securities

 

 

1,127

 

 

Total

 

$

1,552

 

$

59,643

 

$

 

 

(b)         There were no transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 during fiscal 2015.

 

At October 24, 2015, and April 25, 2015, we held available-for-sale marketable securities intended to enhance returns on our cash and to fund future obligations of our non-qualified defined benefit retirement plan, as well as trading securities to fund future obligations of our executive deferred compensation plan and our performance compensation retirement plan. The fair value measurements for our securities are based on quoted prices in active markets, as well as through broker quotes and independent valuation providers, multiplied by the number of shares owned exclusive of any transaction costs.

 

Note 15: Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued a new accounting standard that requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. The new standard supersedes virtually all existing authoritative accounting guidance on revenue recognition and requires additional disclosures and greater use of estimates and

 

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judgments. During July 2015, the FASB deferred the effective date of the revenue recognition guidance by one year, thus making the new accounting standard effective for our fiscal year 2019. We are assessing the potential impact to our consolidated financial statements and financial statement disclosures.

 

In May 2015, the FASB issued a new accounting standard that requires entities to remove investments valued at net asset value per share under the practical expedient from the fair value hierarchy. Disclosure information on those assets will be required to help users understand the nature and risks of those investments. The standard is effective for our fiscal year 2017 and will be applied retrospectively. This standard will have no effect on our consolidated financial statements, but we are currently assessing the impact that this guidance will have on our fair value footnote disclosures.

 

In September 2015, the FASB released a new accounting standard for business combinations that requires the acquirer to recognize adjustments to provisional amounts identified during the measurement period in the reporting period in which the adjustments are determined. The standard is to be applied prospectively beginning with our fiscal year 2017. We are assessing the impact that this guidance will have on our consolidated financial statements.

 

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

We have prepared this Management’s Discussion and Analysis as an aid to understanding our financial results. It should be read in conjunction with the accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements and related Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. After a cautionary note about forward-looking statements, we begin with an introduction to our key businesses and then provide discussions of our results of operations, liquidity and capital resources, and critical accounting policies.

 

This Management’s Discussion and Analysis reflects results only of our continuing operations, unless otherwise noted. During fiscal 2014, we marketed for sale our youth furniture business, Lea Industries, a division of La-Z-Boy Casegoods, Inc. (formerly known as La-Z-Boy Greensboro, Inc.). We were unable to find a buyer for the Lea Industries business, and instead we ceased operations and liquidated all the assets, consisting mostly of inventory, of Lea Industries during fiscal 2015. In the accompanying financial statements, we reported the operating results of Lea Industries as discontinued operations for all periods presented. For the quarter and six months ended October 25, 2014, we recorded $0.5 million and $0.6 million pre-tax income ($0.3 million and $0.4 million after tax), respectively, in discontinued operations related to Lea Industries. We previously reported results of Lea Industries as a component of our Casegoods segment.

 

Also in the first six months of fiscal 2015, we recorded $3.8 million of pre-tax income ($2.4 million after tax) in discontinued operations related to our previously owned subsidiary, American Furniture Company, Incorporated. We sold this subsidiary in fiscal 2007 and reported it as discontinued operations at that time. The income related to the Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act of 2000, provides for distribution of duties, collected by U.S. Customs and Border Protection from antidumping cases to domestic producers that supported the antidumping petition related to wooden bedroom furniture imported from China. When we sold American Furniture Company, Incorporated, our contract provided that we would receive a portion of any such duties to which that entity was entitled.

 

Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements

 

We make forward-looking statements in this report, and our representatives may make oral forward-looking statements from time to time. Generally, forward-looking statements include information concerning possible or

 

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assumed future actions, events or results of operations. More specifically, forward-looking statements may include information regarding:

 

· future income, margins and cash flows

· future growth

· adequacy and cost of financial resources

· future economic performance

· industry and importing trends

· management plans

 

Forward-looking statements also include those preceded or followed by the words “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “hopes,” “plans,” “intends” and “expects” or similar expressions. With respect to all forward-looking statements, we claim the protection of the safe harbor for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.

 

Actual results could differ materially from those we anticipate or project due to a number of factors, including: (a) changes in consumer confidence and demographics; (b) the possibility of another recession; (c) changes in the real estate and credit markets and their effects on our customers, consumers and suppliers; (d) international political unrest, terrorism or war; (e) volatility in energy and other commodities prices; (f) the impact of logistics on imports and exports; (g) interest rate and currency exchange rate changes; (h) operating factors, such as supply, labor or distribution disruptions (e.g. port strikes); (i) changes in the domestic or international regulatory environment; (j) adoption of new accounting principles; (k) severe weather or other natural events such as hurricanes, earthquakes, flooding, tornadoes and tsunamis; (l) our ability to procure fabric rolls and leather hides or cut-and-sewn fabric and leather sets domestically or abroad; (m) information technology conversions or system failures and our ability to recover from a system failure; (n) effects of our brand awareness and marketing programs; (o) the discovery of defects in our products resulting in delays in manufacturing, recall campaigns, reputational damage, or increased warranty costs; (p) litigation arising out of alleged defects in our products; (q) unusual or significant litigation; (r) our ability to locate new La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores (or store owners) and negotiate favorable lease terms for new or existing locations; (s) the results of our restructuring actions; (t) the impact of potential goodwill or intangible asset impairments; and (u) those matters discussed in Item 1A of our fiscal 2015 Annual Report on Form 10-K and other factors identified from time-to-time in our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether to reflect new information or new developments or for any other reason.

 

Introduction

 

Our Business

 

We manufacture, market, import, export, distribute and retail upholstery furniture products. In addition, we import, distribute and retail accessories and casegoods (wood) furniture products. We are the leading global producer of reclining chairs and the second largest manufacturer/distributor of residential furniture in the United States. The La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores retail network is the third largest retailer of single-branded furniture in the United States. We have seven major North American manufacturing locations and six regional distribution centers in the United States to support our speed-to-market and customization strategy.

 

We sell our products, primarily in the United States and Canada, as well as internationally, to furniture retailers and directly to consumers through stores that we own and operate. The centerpiece of our retail distribution strategy is our network of 330 La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores and 573 La-Z-Boy Comfort Studio® locations, each dedicated to marketing our La-Z-Boy branded products. We consider this dedicated space to be

 

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“branded outlets” or “proprietary.” We own 123 of the La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores. The remainder of the La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores, as well as all 573 La-Z-Boy Comfort Studio® locations, are independently owned and operated. La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores help consumers furnish their homes by combining the style, comfort and quality of La-Z-Boy furniture with our available in-home design service. La-Z-Boy Comfort Studio® locations are defined spaces within larger independent retailers that are dedicated to displaying and selling La-Z-Boy branded products. In addition to the La-Z-Boy Comfort Studio® locations, our Kincaid and England operating units have their own dedicated proprietary in-store programs with over 525 outlets and over 1.6 million square feet of proprietary floor space. In total, our proprietary floor space includes approximately 9.3 million square feet.

 

Our goal is to deliver value to our shareholders through improved sales and earnings over the long term through execution of our strategic initiatives. The foundation of our strategic initiatives is driving sales growth in all areas of our business, but most importantly in our flagship La-Z-Boy brand. We are driving this growth in four ways:

 

·                  We are expanding our branded distribution channels by executing our 4-4-5 store growth initiative, through which we plan to expand the La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores network to 400 stores averaging $4 million in sales per store over the five-year period that began with fiscal 2014. In addition, we are increasing our La-Z-Boy Comfort Studio® locations, our store-within-a-store format, as another avenue to expand our branded distribution channels. We expect these initiatives to generate growth in our Retail segment through increased company-owned store count, and to generate growth in our wholesale Upholstery segment as the proprietary distribution network is expanded.

·                  We are also expanding the size of the company-owned retail business through acquisitions of La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores that are owned by our independent dealers, primarily in markets where we see opportunity for growth and can leverage our existing regional distribution network.

·                  We are expanding our market share with the growth of sales through our multi-channel distribution network. In addition to the over 900 branded outlets dedicated to selling La-Z-Boy product (La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores and La-Z-Boy Comfort Studio® locations), approximately 2,800 other dealers also sell La-Z-Boy products. These outlets include some of the best known names in the industry, such as Art Van, Berkshire Hathaway and Slumberland. Additionally, our other brands—England, Kincaid, American Drew and Hammary—enjoy distribution through a combined 1,700 dealers. We believe there is significant growth potential for our brands through these retail channels.

·                  We are expanding our market share in stationary upholstered furniture through a combination of our Live Life Comfortably® marketing campaign, featuring Brooke Shields as our brand ambassador, and our innovative and on-trend product. We continue to invest in this campaign, aimed at changing the image of our brand and widening La-Z-Boy’s appeal among a broader consumer demographic. Integral with this campaign is our Urban Attitudes® collection of smaller-scale stationary furniture targeted at a more style-conscious demographic, younger consumers, and people who live in smaller spaces in urban locations. Stationary upholstery furniture is a significant share of the industry’s total upholstery furniture sales, and we feel that we can capture a much larger share of this market over time.

 

During the first six months of fiscal 2016 the La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® network increased by five stores and our company-owned retail stores increased by 13 stores, 10 that were acquired and three new stores. Our Retail segment grew sales while improving its operating margin during both the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016. Our Casegoods segment continues to make improvements as we complete the transition to an all-import model and the shift to more transitional and casual styles. Additionally, our Upholstery segment improved sales and operating margin during the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016. We

 

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continued to invest in our business through our Live Life Comfortably® marketing campaign and our innovative and on-trend product as we look to gain a larger share of the stationary upholstery furniture market.

 

Our reportable operating segments are the Upholstery segment, the Casegoods segment and the Retail segment.

 

·                  Upholstery Segment. Our Upholstery segment is our largest business and consists primarily of two operating units: La-Z-Boy, our largest operating unit, and our England subsidiary. Our Upholstery segment manufactures and imports upholstered furniture such as recliners and motion furniture, sofas, loveseats, chairs, sectionals, modulars, ottomans and sleeper sofas. The Upholstery segment sells directly to La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores, operators of La-Z-Boy Comfort Studio® locations and England Custom Comfort Center locations, major dealers, and a wide cross-section of other independent retailers.

·                  Casegoods Segment. Our Casegoods segment is an importer, marketer and distributor of casegoods (wood) furniture such as bedroom sets, dining room sets, entertainment centers and occasional pieces, and also manufactures some coordinated upholstered furniture. The Casegoods segment consists of three brands: American Drew, Hammary, and Kincaid. The Casegoods segment sells directly to major dealers, as well as La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores, and a wide cross-section of other independent retailers.

·                  Retail Segment. Our Retail segment consists of 123 company-owned La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® stores. The Retail segment primarily sells upholstered furniture, in addition to some casegoods and other accessories, to the end consumer through our retail network.

 

Results of Operations

Fiscal 2016 Second Quarter and Six Months Compared with Fiscal 2015 Comparable Periods

 

La-Z-Boy Incorporated

 

(Unaudited, amounts in
thousands,
except percentages)

 

Quarter
Ended
10/24/15

 

Quarter
Ended
10/25/14

 

%
Change

 

Six Months
Ended
10/24/15

 

Six Months
Ended
10/25/14

 

%
Change

 

Sales

 

$

382,891

 

$

365,601

 

4.7

%

$

724,314

 

$

692,581

 

4.6

%

Operating income

 

33,394

 

30,192

 

10.6

%

53,360

 

46,683

 

14.3

%

Operating margin

 

8.7

%

8.3

%

 

 

7.4

%

6.7

%

 

 

 

Sales

 

Consolidated sales increased $17.3 million in the second quarter and $31.7 million in the first six months of fiscal 2016, compared with the same periods a year ago. These increases were due to higher sales in our Retail and Upholstery segments. Our Retail segment sales continued to benefit from volume increases in our active stores that have been open for a minimum of 12 months, in addition to sales increases from new and acquired stores. Our Upholstery segment sales increase was driven by stronger volume and favorable changes to our product mix. Our Casegoods segment’s sales decreased in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016 compared with the same periods a year ago, due to the elimination of our hospitality product line in fiscal 2015. The $1.2 million and $3.3 million of lost hospitality volume in the second quarter and first six months was partly offset by increases in sales of our ongoing product lines, driven by higher orders of our newer collections as we have shifted our product to more transitional and casual styles.

 

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Operating Margin

 

Our operating margin increased 0.4 percentage point and 0.7 percentage point for the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago.

 

·                  Our gross margin improved 2.6 percentage points and 2.4 percentage points in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the prior year comparable periods.

 

·                  Gross margin in our Upholstery segment benefitted from higher unit volume and favorable changes in our product mix, as well as supply chain efficiencies. Also, legal settlements provided a 0.5 percentage point improvement in the gross margin rate in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016.

·                  Our Retail segment gross margin improved due to increased custom orders and in-home design services, which generate a higher gross margin than sales of stock units.

·                  Additionally, the higher weighting of sales for our Retail segment, which carry a higher gross margin than our wholesale segments, positively impacted our consolidated gross margin.

·                  Partially offsetting these benefits was a lower gross margin in our Casegoods segment, due to the benefit in the second quarter of fiscal 2015 of a reduction to our LIFO reserve for domestically manufactured inventory which was not repeated in the second quarter of fiscal 2016. The LIFO impact was somewhat offset by the benefit of the transition to an all-import model.

 

·                  Selling, General, and Administrative (“SG&A”) expenses as a percentage of sales increased 2.2 percentage points and 1.7 percentage points in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago.

 

·                  Incentive compensation costs were higher in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016 compared with the same periods a year ago. The main driver of this increase was the improvement in our current year consolidated financial performance against our incentive-based targets compared with our prior year results. The improvement resulted in a 0.4 percentage point increase and a 0.3 percentage point increase for the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively.

·                  Our advertising expense was 0.4 percentage point higher and 0.2 percentage point higher in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago. Our advertising dollars are spent based on our promotional calendar, and this can cause a shift in spending from year-to-year between fiscal quarters as a percentage of sales.

·                  Our warranty expense was 0.3 percentage point higher and 0.4 percentage point higher in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago. Our increase in warranty expense was primarily due to increasingly higher replacement part costs and labor costs from our more complex product lines. Additionally, warranty expense in the first six months of fiscal 2016 was higher due to favorable accrual adjustments which reflected a change in the prior estimates of our product warranty liability during the first six months of fiscal 2015.

·                  Professional fees were 0.2 percentage point higher and 0.3 percentage point higher in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago, primarily due to spending for our continued ERP implementation, our new e-commerce web site and other matters.

·                  Higher costs associated with our new world headquarters, primarily depreciation, were 0.4 percentage point higher in both the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago.

 

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·                  Additionally, the growth of our Retail segment, which has a higher level of SG&A expense as a percent of sales than our wholesale segments, also contributed to the increase in SG&A expense as a percent of sales.

 

These items are further explained in the discussion of each segment’s results later in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis.

 

Upholstery Segment

 

(Unaudited, amounts in
thousands,
except percentages)

 

Quarter
Ended
10/24/15

 

Quarter
Ended
10/25/14

 

%
Change

 

Six Months
Ended
10/24/15

 

Six Months
Ended
10/25/14

 

%
Change

 

Sales

 

$

305,817

 

$

297,267

 

2.9

%

$

578,493

 

$

560,126

 

3.3

%

Operating income

 

37,040

 

32,607

 

13.6

%

61,634

 

54,624

 

12.8

%

Operating margin

 

12.1

%

11.0

%

 

 

10.7

%

9.8

%

 

 

 

Sales

 

Our Upholstery segment’s sales increased $8.6 million in the second quarter and $18.4 million in the first six months of fiscal 2016, compared with the same periods a year ago. Increased unit volume drove a 1.8% increase and a favorable change in product mix resulted in a 1.2% increase in sales in the second quarter of fiscal 2016, while those same factors drove a 2.2% and a 1.3% increase in sales in the first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively. Our product mix in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016 included a shift to more powered motion units and an increase in motion sofas as compared with the same periods a year ago. Powered motion units have a higher average selling price than motion units without power, as do motion sofas as compared to stationary products.

 

Operating Margin

 

Our Upholstery segment’s operating margin improved 1.1 percentage point and 0.9 percentage point in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago.

 

·                  The segment’s gross margin increased 2.5 percentage points and 2.1 percentage points during the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago. Higher unit volume and favorable changes in our product mix provided a 0.5 percentage point and a 0.7 percentage point benefit for the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively. Efficiencies in our supply chain, which includes procurement and manufacturing operations, improved in part due to having the investments in our ERP system implementation in the prior fiscal periods, provided a 2.0 percentage point and 1.2 percentage point benefit for the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively. Additionally, the benefit of a legal settlement resulted in a 0.6 percentage point increase the segment’s gross margin for both the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016.

·                  The segment’s SG&A expense as a percentage of sales was 1.4 percentage points and 1.2 percentage points higher during the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago.

 

·                  Warranty expense was 0.3 percentage point and 0.4 percentage point higher as a percent of sales in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago. Our warranty expense was higher in the second quarter primarily due to increasingly higher replacement part costs and labor costs from our more complex product lines. Additionally, our warranty expense was higher in the first six months of fiscal 2016 mainly due to favorable accrual adjustments during the first six months of

 

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fiscal 2015 which reflected a change in the prior estimates of our product warranty liability during the first six months of fiscal 2015.

·                  Professional fees were 0.3 percentage point and 0.4 percentage point higher as a percentage of sales in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago due to spending for our continued ERP implementation and other matters.

·                  Higher costs associated with our new world headquarters resulted in a 0.3 percentage point increase in SG&A expense as a percent of sales during both the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016.

 

Casegoods Segment

 

(Unaudited, amounts in
thousands,
except percentages)

 

Quarter
Ended
10/24/15

 

Quarter
Ended
10/25/14

 

%
Change

 

Six Months
Ended
10/24/15

 

Six Months
Ended
10/25/14

 

%
Change

 

Sales

 

$

28,219

 

$

28,888

 

(2.3

)%

$

51,612

 

$

57,811

 

(10.7

)%

Operating income

 

2,634

 

2,995

 

(12.1

)%

4,324

 

4,520

 

(4.3

)%

Operating margin

 

9.3

%

10.4

%

 

 

8.4

%

7.8

%

 

 

 

Sales

 

Our Casegoods segment’s sales decreased $0.7 million in the second quarter and $6.2 million in the first six months of fiscal 2016 compared with the same periods a year ago. We had $1.2 million lower sales and $3.3 million lower sales in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago due to the elimination of our hospitality product line during fiscal 2015. In the second quarter of fiscal 2016, the $1.2 million of lost hospitality volume was partly offset by a $0.5 million increase in sales of our ongoing product lines, driven by higher orders of our newer collections as we have shifted our product line to more transitional and casual styles and an improvement in our in-stock position of these newer collections.

 

Operating Margin

 

Our Casegoods segment’s operating margin decreased 1.1 percentage points in the second quarter of fiscal 2016, but increased 0.6 percentage point for the first six months of fiscal 2016 when compared with the same periods a year ago.

 

·                  The segment’s gross margin decreased 1.9 percentage points during the second quarter of fiscal 2016 compared with the same period a year ago. Gross margin in the second quarter of fiscal 2015 was positively impacted by a $2.0 million reduction to our LIFO reserve for domestically manufactured inventory which was not repeated in the second quarter of fiscal 2016. We ceased manufacturing product domestically during the second quarter of fiscal 2015, and as a result the stream of domestically manufactured inventory was not replaced, and our LIFO reserve was reduced accordingly. In the second quarter of fiscal 2016 the transition to an all-import model for our wood furniture, and the higher margin we receive on imported product, somewhat offset the LIFO impact from the second quarter of fiscal 2015. For the first six months of fiscal 2016, the segment’s gross margin improved 0.5 percentage point, when the benefit of the transition to an all-import model for our wood furniture more than offset the LIFO benefit in the first six months of fiscal 2015.

·                  The segment’s SG&A expense as a percentage of sales decreased 0.8 percentage point and 0.1 percentage point in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago, primarily because of lower incentive compensation, due to lower financial performance of the segment against the incentive-based targets.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Retail Segment

 

(Unaudited, amounts in
thousands,
except percentages)

 

Quarter
Ended
10/24/15

 

Quarter
Ended
10/25/14

 

%
Change

 

Six Months
Ended
10/24/15

 

Six Months
Ended
10/25/14

 

%
Change

 

Sales

 

$

96,480

 

$

84,589

 

14.1

%

$

183,181

 

$

157,494

 

16.3

%

Operating income

 

5,716

 

3,682

 

55.2

%

10,445

 

3,997

 

161.3

%

Operating margin

 

5.9

%

4.4

%

 

 

5.7

%

2.5

%

 

 

 

Sales

 

Our Retail segment’s sales increased $11.9 million in the second quarter and $25.6 million in the first six months of fiscal 2016 compared with the same periods a year ago, in part due to the increased sales volume of our currently active stores that have been open for a minimum of 12 months, which were 1.3% higher and 3.9% higher in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively. The sales increases for our currently active stores that have been open for a minimum of 12 months resulted primarily from higher average ticket sales, driven by a higher percentage of custom orders, increased in-home design services and a shift to more powered units. In addition, our acquired stores added $3.4 million in sales for the segment in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016. The remainder of the sales increase for the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016 came from our new stores that were not open in the prior year periods.

 

Operating Margin

 

Our Retail segment’s operating margin increased 1.5 percentage points and 3.2 percentage points in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago.

 

·                  The segment’s gross margin increased 1.1 percentage points and 0.6 percentage point in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago, and was due primarily to increased custom orders and in-home design services, as well as a shift to more powered units.

·                  The segment’s SG&A expense as a percent of sales decreased 0.4 percentage point and 2.6 percentage points in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago. Our sales volume increase from our currently active stores that have been open for a minimum of 12 months allowed us to better leverage our fixed SG&A expenses (primarily occupancy and administrative costs). Somewhat offsetting the decrease in the second quarter was higher advertising expense, which increased 0.5 percentage point as a percent of sales, due to some advertising and promotional calendar shifts. Advertising expense was flat as a percentage of sales for the first six months of fiscal 2016 compared with the same period a year ago. Our advertising dollars are spent based on our promotional calendar, and this can cause shifts in spending from year-to-year between fiscal quarters as a percentage of sales.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Corporate and Other

 

(Unaudited, amounts in
thousands,
except percentages)

 

Quarter
Ended
10/24/15

 

Quarter
Ended
10/25/14

 

%
Change

 

Six Months
Ended
10/24/15

 

Six Months
Ended
10/25/14

 

%
Change

 

Sales

 

$

1,294

 

$

513

 

152.2

%

$

2,896

 

$

1,479

 

95.8

%

Eliminations

 

(48,919

)

(45,656

)

(7.1

)%

(91,818

)

(84,329

)

(8.9

)%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating loss

 

(11,809

)

(9,082

)

(30.0

)%

(22,691

)

(16,805

)

(35.0

)%

Restructuring

 

(187

)

(10

)

N/M

 

(352

)

347

 

(201.4

)%

 

Sales

 

Sales increased in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016 compared with the same periods a year ago, primarily due to intercompany commission revenue charged to our reportable segments by our global trading company in Hong Kong (which began operations at the beginning of fiscal 2016).

 

Eliminations increased in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016 compared with the same periods a year ago due to higher sales from our Upholstery segment to our Retail segment as a result of the increased volume in our Retail segment, as well as the elimination of the intercompany commissions of our global trading company in Hong Kong.

 

Operating Loss

 

Our Corporate and Other operating loss was $2.7 million higher and $5.9 million higher in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago. This was primarily a result of higher incentive compensation costs of $1.0 million and $1.4 million in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with the same periods a year ago. In addition, we incurred higher professional fees related to our continued ERP sales order management implementation and our new e-commerce web site, start-up costs for our global trading company in Hong Kong, as well as higher depreciation expense for our new world headquarters.

 

The $0.2 million and $0.4 million of restructuring expense, respectively, which we recorded in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, related mainly to rent expense for an idled showroom and accelerated depreciation expense for an idled asset. The restructuring expense of less than $0.1 million we recorded in the second quarter of fiscal 2015 related mainly to inventory recoveries net of severance and benefit-related costs. The $0.3 million restructuring income recorded in the first six months of fiscal 2015 related mainly to inventory recoveries net of severance and benefit-related costs. All of these restructuring activities related to our Casegoods segment.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

Other income (expense) was $0.5 million of income and $2.5 million of income in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016, respectively, compared with income of $0.2 million and expense of $0.1 million in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2015. The changes resulted from higher foreign currency exchange rate gains realized in fiscal 2016, as well as higher gains realized on the sale of investments.

 

Income Taxes

 

Our effective tax rates for continuing operations in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2016 were 36.2% and 36.1%, respectively, compared with 35.3% for the second quarter and first six months of fiscal 2015.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Our effective tax rate varies from the 35% statutory rate primarily due to state taxes, less the benefit of the U.S. manufacturing deduction and foreign earnings in jurisdictions with lower tax rates than the U.S.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Our sources of liquidity include cash and equivalents, short-term and long-term investments, cash from operations and amounts available under our credit facility. We believe these sources remain adequate to meet our short-term and long-term liquidity requirements, finance our long-term growth plans, meet debt service, and fulfill other cash requirements for day-to-day operations, dividends to shareholders and capital expenditures. We had cash and equivalents of $74.6 million at October 24, 2015, compared with $98.3 million at April 25, 2015. In addition, we had investments to enhance our returns on cash of $31.8 million at October 24, 2015, compared with $45.5 million at April 25, 2015. The decrease in investments to enhance our returns on cash was a result of converting those investments to cash to fund acquisitions, acquire assets through capital expenditures, fund increases in inventories, purchase shares of our stock and fund dividend payments to shareholders. Partially offsetting these items were cash collections of accounts receivable, net sales of investments, and net income generated during the period.

 

We maintain a revolving credit facility secured primarily by all of our accounts receivable, inventory, and cash deposit and securities accounts. Availability under the agreement fluctuates according to a borrowing base calculated on eligible accounts receivable and inventory. The credit agreement includes affirmative and negative covenants that apply under certain circumstances, including a fixed charge coverage ratio requirement that applies when excess availability under the line is less than certain thresholds. At October 24, 2015, we were not subject to the fixed charge coverage ratio requirement, had $4.0 million of borrowings outstanding under the agreement, and had excess availability of $139.4 million of the $150.0 million credit commitment.

 

Capital expenditures for the first six months of fiscal 2016 were $13.9 million compared with $40.6 million during the first six months of fiscal 2015. Our capital expenditures were lower in the first six months of fiscal 2016 compared with the first six months of fiscal 2015 because the prior year included our construction of our new world headquarters. We have no material contractual commitments outstanding for future capital expenditures. We expect capital expenditures to be in the range of $25.0 million to $30.0 million in fiscal 2016.

 

Our board of directors has sole authority to determine if and when future dividends will be declared and on what terms. We expect the board to continue declaring regular quarterly cash dividends for the foreseeable future, but may discontinue doing so at any time.

 

The following table illustrates the main components of our cash flows:

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

(Unaudited, amounts in thousands)

 

10/24/15

 

10/25/14

 

Cash Flows Provided By (Used For)

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

$

21,723

 

$

31,768

 

Net cash used for investing activities

 

(22,314

)

(33,156

)

Net cash used for financing activities

 

(22,211

)

(32,873

)

Exchange rate changes

 

(934

)

(75

)

Change in cash and equivalents

 

$

(23,736

)

$

(34,336

)

 

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Table of Contents

 

Operating Activities

 

During the first six months of fiscal 2016, net cash provided by operating activities was $21.7 million. Our cash provided by operating activities was primarily attributable to net income generated during the first six months of fiscal 2016 and cash collections of accounts receivable of $5.0 million, driven by the continued improvement in the financial health of our customer base, especially our independent La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries® dealers. Somewhat offsetting these items were cash used to fund increases in inventories of $21.5 million and a contribution to our pension plan of $7.0 million. Our inventories were higher in the first six months of fiscal 2016 due to increased retail finished goods inventory from the dealer acquisitions we completed during the second quarter, as well as higher raw materials inventory to improve our service levels to our customers.

 

During the first six months of fiscal 2015, net cash provided by operating activities was $31.8 million, primarily due to net income generated during the period. Partly offsetting net income was cash used to fund increases in inventories and to settle incentive compensation awards. The $11.0 million increase in inventories during the first six months of fiscal 2015 was primarily due to higher raw materials inventory to improve our in-stock position for the fall selling season, as well as higher finished goods inventory in our regional distribution centers to improve the in-stock position of key items for our customers.

 

Investing Activities

 

During the first six months of fiscal 2016, net cash used for investing activities was $22.3 million, which included $19.2 million for acquisitions, $13.9 million for capital expenditures and $11.7 for purchases of investments, offset by proceeds of $19.4 million from the sale of investments. Capital expenditures during the period primarily related to spending on manufacturing machinery and equipment, spending on our continued ERP system implementation, as well as the relocation of one of our regional distribution centers.

 

During the first six months of fiscal 2015, net cash used for investing activities was $33.2 million, including capital expenditures of $40.6 million. Capital expenditures during the period primarily related to spending on our new world headquarters, as well as spending on new stores and manufacturing machinery and equipment. In addition, we invested $6.4 million of cash during the first six months of fiscal 2015, primarily to purchase life insurance contracts related to our executive deferred compensation plan and our performance compensation retirement plan. Partly offsetting these items was a reduction in restricted cash of $7.3 million, all of which related to an outstanding letter of credit that expired when we paid off our outstanding industrial revenue bond.

 

Financing Activities

 

During the first six months of fiscal 2016, we used $22.2 million cash for financing activities, primarily in purchasing our common stock and paying our quarterly dividend, which was partially offset by $4.0 million in net borrow